Art Links Gallery - ASCII Art
   
Latif Maulan
Malaysian
Contemporary
Artists

oil paintings by latif
 
   
  ASCII,
in computer science, acronym for American Standard Code for Information Interchange. In computing, a coding scheme that assigns numeric values to letters, numbers, punctuation marks, and certain other characters. By standardizing the values used for these characters, ASCII enables computers and computer programs to exchange information.

ASCII provides for 256 codes divided into two sets—standard and extended—of 128 each. These sets represent the total possible combinations of either 7 or 8 bits, the latter being the number of bits in 1 byte. The basic, or standard, ASCII set uses 7 bits for each code, yielding 128 character codes from 0 through 127 (hexadecimal 00H through 7FH). The extended ASCII set uses 8 bits for each code, yielding an additional 128 codes numbered 128 through 255 (hexadecimal 80H through FFH).

In the standard ASCII character set, the first 32 values are assigned to communication and printer control codes—nonprinting characters, such as backspace, carriage return, and tab—that are used to control the way information is transferred from one computer to another or from a computer to a printer. The remaining 96 codes are assigned to common punctuation marks, the digits 0 through 9, and the uppercase and lowercase letters of the Roman alphabet.

The extended ASCII codes
128 through 255, are assigned to variable sets of characters by computer manufacturers and software developers. These codes are not as interchangeable among different programs and computers as are the standard ASCII characters. IBM, for example, uses a group of extended ASCII characters generally called the IBM extended character set for its personal computers; Apple Computer uses a similar but different group of extended ASCII characters for its Macintosh line of computers. Thus, whereas the standard ASCII character set is universal among microcomputer hardware and software, extended ASCII characters can be interpreted correctly only if a program, computer, or printer is designed to do so.

ASCII Character Set, in computer science, a standard 7-bit code for representing characters—letters, digits, punctuation, and control instructions—with binary values; the code values range from 0 through 127. Although ASCII lacks both the accent marks and the special characters used in European languages and is unable to represent characters in non-Roman alphabets used in many languages, it is internationally important because it is the most universal character-coding system. Many non-English character sets are extensions or modifications of the ASCII coding system. Most personal-computer systems use an 8-bit extended or modified ASCII code, with an extra 128 characters used for special characters, foreign-language letters and punctuation, and graphic symbols.

ASCII File,
in computer science, also called a text file, a text-only file, or an ASCII text file. A document file in the universally recognized text format called ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange). An ASCII file contains characters, spaces, punctuation, carriage returns, and sometimes tabs and an end-of-file marker, but it contains no formatting information. This generic format is sometimes referred to as "text" and is useful for transferring unadorned but readable files between programs that could not otherwise understand each other's documents.

Extended ASCII, in computer science,
any set of characters assigned to ASCII values between decimal 128 and 255 (hexadecimal 80 through FF). Extended ASCII differs from standard ASCII in that no single defined group of characters can be considered the extended ASCII character set. The specific characters assigned to extended ASCII codes can vary widely between computers (IBM PC and Apple Macintosh, for example), and between programs, fonts, or sets of graphics characters. Essentially, standard ASCII covers the basics by providing codes for characters, such as letters and numbers with which all computers must work; extended ASCII provides added capability by allowing for 128 additional characters, such as accented letters, graphics characters, and special symbols.
The codes used in extended ASCII represent the additional values made possible by using all 8 bits in a byte for coding (as opposed to the 7 bits used for the standard ASCII character set)

 
     
 
 
     
     

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